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News & Press: Casemaker

Casemaker Weekly - April 3rd

Wednesday, April 3, 2019  

Searching for Cases with Citation

The most frequently used function of Casemaker for most users is searching by citation. From the home page, you can simply type your citation in. You do not have to worry about being too picky if you use the wrong spacing, punctuation, or capitalization; Casemaker will automatically correct that for you. You do however need to make sure you are using only the reporter citation and the proper abbreviation. Casemaker goes by the Blue Book citation guidelines if you have any questions regarding abbreviations. For example, with Kearns v. Ford Motor Co., 567 F.3d 1120 (9th Cir. 2009), all you would put in the search bar is 567 F.3d 1120. Be sure you select the correct jurisdiction, however, you will not be able to pull up a New Hampshire Superior Court case when searching in US Court of Appeals!

 

Sometimes a particular citation brings up more than one result, and there is a very good reason for this. The other case shares a page with the case you were searching for. For example, your case may end on page 104 and another case begins on the same page of the reporter. This means even if you are typing in a pin cite, you will still be able to locate the case you are looking for.

Citing References

While it is great to get that green thumbs up or red thumbs down from Casecheck+ to tell you if a case has been treated negatively in subsequent cases - it is also nice just to have a list of what actually cited the case you are reading. This is where Citing References comes in. When you are reading a case, you will notice in the bar above the case a link for Citing References. This will provide you with a list of cases that have cited this case. Links to these cases are included and will take you directly to the portion where the case you are researching is involved. When you pull up the list of Citing References you can narrow the results by keyword or jurisdiction using the menu on the left as well.

Structured Material & Subsections

Casemaker’s statutes, constitutions, rules, and regulations are fully structured with the appropriate indentation for subsections and subdivisions, making them easy to read and cite (hovering over a subsection lists the full subsection cite). In addition, all documents that contain subsections in Casemaker have a “GoTo” dropdown list so the user can quickly navigate to (and have highlighted) any subsection in the document.

That is all for this week! We will back with more tips and tricks next week. Thanks again for making Casemaker a Valued Member Benefit.

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